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  • Admin Commented Janita_HunterWater over 1 year ago
    Removed by moderator.
  • Andrea over 1 year ago
    Thank you for your reply. Lots of interesting details there, and fixing the water leaks sounds great. I am interested in how much the local industry uses in terms of water (e.g. coal industry spraying water coal to reduce dust). I have heard that drinking water is used. Perhaps fixing this before a desal plant would be a good idea. Where can I find out more about water usage by Hunter industries? Thanks
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  • Andrea over 1 year ago
    I recently attended a market where Hunter Water was informing/consulting with the public regarding building a desalination plant in Belmont. I am against the proposal, but based on where the stickers (support/want more info/prioritise other strategies) were placed on the available board, it looks like opposition is rare. I'd like to open up the discussion on this point. What other strategies is Hunter Water pursuing to reduce water usage, are these programs being evaluated systematically for their effectiveness, and where can we, as members of the public, find the outcomes of those evaluations? Thank you
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    • Admin Commented NatalieA_HunterWater over 1 year ago
      Hunter Water has many strategies that explore reducing water usage, including our Water Resilience Program and Leakage Reduction Program. The Water Resilience Program engages with our regional partners and our community to seek new ways of saving water. This allows us to keep our options open in future source planning and avoid over-investment and over-reliance on systems which could prove unnecessary as new technologies emerge. We are also exploring new approaches to long term planning so that we can adapt to future uncertainties such as climate variability and technological change. The Leakage Reduction Program includes a range of activities to reduce leaks throughout Hunter Water’s network and on customers properties. This approach is already reporting good results. Since June 2017, we have assisted our customers in saving more than 117 million litres through fixing leaks at their properties. To further decrease leaks in our system, we are targeting to proactively survey the entire 5,047 km of water mains for leaks during the 2018/19 financial year, and we are on track to meet this target. During 2018 we proactively surveyed 4,718 km of water mains for leaks. Leakage was at 7177 ML in 2017/18, a reduction of 740 ML from the previous financial year, saving of 296 Olympic swimming pools. We have also relined Black Hill Reservoir to reduce leakage, saving 215 million litres of water per year.We are also engaging with our community through the Love Water campaign to increase the awareness of water as a precious resource and encourage water conservation behaviours. Should we enter an extended dry period, the Lower Hunter Water Plan outlines a range of drought response measures to be implemented as overall storage levels fall. These measures include the staged implementation of water restrictions, consumer water-saving programs, network leak detection and repair, and as a measure of last resort, plans for a temporary desalination plant to provide a climate-independent source of water should extended drought conditions persist.
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  • Grahamstown Catchment almost 2 years ago
    I've noticed conversations occurring about allowing access for recreation on Grahamstown Dam, including at local council. How can this conversation be opened up for discussion with the local community?
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    • Admin Commented NatalieA_HunterWater over 1 year ago
      Thanks for your enquiry and interest in this topic. A review of recreational activity on Grahamstown Dam is presently underway, and will consider water quality implications of extending the current level of activity. This work is technically complex and will require consultation with stakeholders including NSW Health and Port Stephens Council. Given the complexity of the issue and the need for comprehensive stakeholder engagement, it's expected that the work will take until the end of 2019 to complete. We will certainly be looking at ways of incorporating community feedback as part of this review.
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  • Tony Strazzari almost 2 years ago
    As part of water saving what advice and incentives apply to households considering directing grey water (shower, bath, clothes washing) onto gardens?
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    • Admin Commented NatalieA_HunterWater over 1 year ago
      Thanks for your question. There are two types of greywater systems that allow you to use greywater in different ways: A greywater diversion device allows untreated greywater to be used for outdoor purposes by distributing water to your garden through a below-surface irrigation system. A greywater treatment system enables you to use treated greywater for above surface irrigation, toilets and washing machines. Treated greywater can also be stored.These systems help you save water and therefore save on your water bills. For further information, please refer to the Saving Water FAQ section on the Hunter Water website: https://www.hunterwater.com.au/About-Us/FAQs/Saving-Water.aspx
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      • Rick over 1 year ago
        Is it not true that grey water can become black water and thus be very bad for the environment?
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        • Admin Commented NatalieA_HunterWater over 1 year ago
          Greywater is wastewater from non-toilet plumbing fixtures such as showers, basins and taps.Blackwater is water that has been mixed with waste from the toilet. Because of the potential for contamination by pathogens and grease, water from kitchens and dishwashers should be excluded from greywater and considered as blackwater. If treated and reused sustainably, greywater reuse can have a positive impact on the environment by reducing the volume of wastewater discharged to waterways and reducing demand for potable water. Appropriately treated greywater can be reused indoors for flushing toilets and clothes washing, and outdoors for garden watering. However, if greywater is not treated and reused sustainably it can have negative impacts on the environment such as turning septic and producing an unpleasant odour.There is some useful information at the yourhome.gov.au website: http://www.yourhome.gov.au/water/wastewater-reuse
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  • Wave415 over 1 year ago
    Hi! I'm trying to access all the forums but all I see is one topic for ideas for improving the forums, how can I engage with other community members on different topics?
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    • Admin Commented NatalieA_HunterWater over 1 year ago
      Hi. Thanks for your feedback. Since you have Signed Up to Your Voice, and we have now changed this forum to Have your Say (instead of 'How to improve Your Voice'), you can now have your say here on any topic or reply to other comments on this page. You can also click on any of the other project or initiative pages to comment on a particular topic. For example; Price Review.
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  • Kelly57 almost 2 years ago
    I am sure that everyone wants to conserve water - for the environment and to save on costs. Can you recommend any brand(s) of trigger type hose nozzles that save water? Similar to the low flow shower heads. Thank you.
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    • Admin Commented NatalieA_HunterWater over 1 year ago
      Thanks for your question about trigger nozzles. Any nozzle fitted to the end of your hose and that you control with a trigger that does not leak will help save water. This is because you must depress the trigger continuously by hand or lock it in the ‘on’ position for water to flow. There are various makes and models that are available at different prices. Check with your local hardware store or supermarket. You can also refer to websites such as www.choice.com.au for recommendations.
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  • Kerry on Tomaree Peninsular almost 2 years ago
    Allowing me to access the survey now that I have finally managed to sign up will help? I cannot contact either of the Ladies' email addresses. I will need a prompt response as it closes in less than two hours? phone number is 02 4984-3151if anyone actually reads this.
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  • nturns almost 2 years ago
    Can you inform me on some details concerning the pumping of water from the Tomago Sand beds and if the PFOS contamination has impacted in any way on this water supply.
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    • Admin Commented NatalieA_HunterWater almost 2 years ago
      Hello, Thank you for your comment. The Tomago Sandbeds are a safe and reliable back up water supply for the Lower Hunter. We are not currently operating the Sandbeds for supply, but they can be used during times of shortfall.Hunter Water has an extensive ‘catchment to tap’ water quality monitoring program in place as part of our Drinking Water Quality Management System. We routinely test for a wide range of physical, chemical and biological characteristics at all stages of the supply system to ensure that our drinking water complies with the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. Results from our water quality program can be found at www.hunterwater.com.au/waterquality. Hunter Water has developed an operating strategy for the Tomago Sandbeds in consultation with the NSW PFAS Expert Panel. This strategy was formally approved by the Expert Panel in May 2018 and allows us to operate the Sandbeds with controls in place to ensure that the water supply is safe. The implementation of the operating strategy is overseen by NSW Health.
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