Stockton land restoration

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Hunter Water is conducting restoration work to its land at Stockton which was previously a council landfill site. So far, work has included ground-works, ‘capping’ with clean sand and mulch, removing bitou bush and other weeds, and replanting with native species.

To protect this area we need to construct a temporary chain wire fence around this part of the land (please see "Photo fence location and type" for more information). Protecting this land will be particularly important while the new native plants are establishing.

The new chain wire fence will not be a permanent solution. We are currently working with key stakeholders to pursue long term outcomes for the land at Stockton, including a permanent fencing solution.

You are welcome to ask us questions or provide feedback on our rehabilitation of this section of the land (below).

Why is fencing needed?

This section of land was previously a council landfill site and now contains contaminants below the topsoil. The new sand, mulch and native species provide a protective barrier and stop any contaminants below being exposed. This barrier is being disturbed by frequent illegal access by four wheel driver vehicles. In addition, illegal rubbish dumping requires maintenance and regular clean-ups.

Hunter Water is conducting restoration work to its land at Stockton which was previously a council landfill site. So far, work has included ground-works, ‘capping’ with clean sand and mulch, removing bitou bush and other weeds, and replanting with native species.

To protect this area we need to construct a temporary chain wire fence around this part of the land (please see "Photo fence location and type" for more information). Protecting this land will be particularly important while the new native plants are establishing.

The new chain wire fence will not be a permanent solution. We are currently working with key stakeholders to pursue long term outcomes for the land at Stockton, including a permanent fencing solution.

You are welcome to ask us questions or provide feedback on our rehabilitation of this section of the land (below).

Why is fencing needed?

This section of land was previously a council landfill site and now contains contaminants below the topsoil. The new sand, mulch and native species provide a protective barrier and stop any contaminants below being exposed. This barrier is being disturbed by frequent illegal access by four wheel driver vehicles. In addition, illegal rubbish dumping requires maintenance and regular clean-ups.

  • Tank traps re-located to protect land and improve security

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    Some of the concrete tank traps, removed from the shoreline in October 2020, have been relocated toward the front of Hunter Water’s land along Fullerton Street, Stockton. This is an interim measure to improve site security and protect the land during rehabilitation work.

    Much of the noxious weed bitou bush has now been removed, and further ground work and reestablishment of native plant species is planned.

    A large amount of dumped rubbish has also been removed, highlighting the increasing number of four-wheel drives illegally accessing the land. Vehicles driving on this area damages the environment, especially during re-vegetation, and is a safety risk.

    A shortlist of three fencing types is currently being developed. These options will be discussed with the community representatives of Stockton Community Group within the next few weeks.

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  • World War II tank trap removal

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    Over the past two weeks we have removed most of the concrete World War II tank traps from our section of the shoreline at Stockton beach.

    The tank traps were removed to improve the safety of swimmers and surfers using this section of the beach.

    185 of an estimated 200 tank traps have been relocated from the water and are being stored on our site. It’s possible the remaining tank traps, which remain buried, will be uncovered in future heavy sea events.

    The history of the traps on our land was well documented as part of heritage studies before we removed them. We are exploring the potential for reusing the traps in future.

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  • Fencing work to begin

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    Work will soon begin to construct a chain-mesh fence around the southern portion of land. This land was previously a council landfill site and is being restored and planted with native species. It's necessary to protect the area, especially while the new native plants are establishing.

Page last updated: 06 July 2021, 15:44